linux

Playing with the Darwin Calendar Server

Sorry for the lack of posts lately, I've been caught up with school and updating my FOSS on the side whenever I have some spare time.

The server that runs this site as well as diffingo.com and a few others is almost always idle - the load averages rarely exceed 0.5, and are most often sitting somewhere around 0.2 (it's a 1U/Core 2 Quad Q9550@2.83GHz/8GB RAM/2x1TB RAID 1). I have bigger plans for it in the future, but at the moment there just isn't a great deal for it to do since it handles everything so quickly.

I have been wanting to see how KVM VMs perform on it as well as try out the Darwin Calendar Server (DCS)... Seeing as DCS requires Python 2.5 and I didn't want to mess around with the live server's configuration (CentOS 5.x ships with Python 2.4), I installed Fedora 13 in a virtual machine so I could test the calendar server safely.

To my surprise, KVM works really, really well... I wasn't expecting that seeing as the versions I had used in Fedora were so much more recent. The performance is good - I haven't performed any stress-testing yet (which obviously will show a gap between the VM and running natively) but the DCS is running very smoothly and feels very responsive, so I'm confident that the difference in performance is not so large.

How I got the DCS running on Linux is a whole other story... I'll save that another post (F13/F14 DCS installation guides coming soon) but is it ever handy to have a CalDAV server! Previously, I was only able to sync calendars manually (with the USB cable) which made checking for homework assignments extremely annoying, as half of the information was always my iPod and the other half on iCal and I had to sync all the time. Now it's all over-the-air, so as long as there's Internet connectivity the calendar events can be pulled in or pushed out.

Random thought

In any of my future classes related to operating systems, I want to try saying "sudo" instead of "please" and see how many people get it :P

I'll keep you updated.

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I'm tired of this (rev3)

Apple has been in my good books for a long time because as their computers have no problems. Nearly no viruses, popups or adware at all. No additional software needed. Their computers 'just worked', right out of the box. I'm seeing more and more things in Apple that I don't like, things that I stopped using Microsoft's products for. Apple's products work wonderfully, but in many cases only with other Apple-based products. iPhone. iPod. iLife. iMac. And even then I find they don't work that well all the time.

A perfect example is recently when I was creating a slideshow using music purchased from iTunes. The iTunes Plus tracks worked flawlessly - Drag & drop, that was it. I'm happy Steve Jobs supports it and I really hope the industry moves DRM free... But I'm getting off track. I try the regular iTunes tracks (DRM encumbered) and turns out they refused to be added to the iMovie slideshow claiming the computer wasn't authorized. I entered my password, authorizing from iMovie which didn't work so then from iTunes too. I even deauthorized and reauthorized the Macbook in iTunes to make sure. Then I tried playing the tracks in iTunes - It worked. I switched to iMovie and what d'ya you know, same results. In the end I burnt all the songs to two CDs and then ripped them. Another two hours of my time wasted. Apple's FairPlay doesn't seem too fair at all - I couldn't use it on the very same computer I had purchased the songs from, and forget even trying to play them on another computer. I don't even know if you can put songs purchased from iTunes onto non-iPod players without having to break the DRM first (which is illegal in the US).

This time, Apple has added encrypted firmware and hashes in the database which makes it near impossible to use a new iPod with 3rd party tools (see the article I posted at the beginning of this entry). To make it worse, the encrypted firmware makes you unable to run Linux (aka Rockbox) on it to workaround the database issue. One could say otherwise, but I don't see the advantage of encrypted firmware or hashes in the database to users... What do the 3rd party tools change from Apple point of view? Users have still purchased their iPods, and whether people update iPods from iTunes or GtkPod doesn't make a difference to Apple whatsoever.

Considering one can't use an iPod with Linux anymore, I'll have to use iTunes from Windows or Mac OS X. And considering what happened the last time I used iTunes, I won't be buying the new iPod everyone's talking about either.

My ramblings on Marvell 88E8056, 2.6.21, sky2

The Marvell LAN on my GA-965P-S3 board stopped working all of a sudden after a reboot the other day, and I franticly tried flashing the BIOS & firmware, I undid my overclock, even rewired everything inside. No luck.

The problem was due to the semi-broken sky2 driver... From what I've heard it's been broken for a while (and developers know it). Sky2 seems to work pretty well from my experience.. Apart from this.

Anyways the cause was the new 2.6.21 kernels, which is why it only started happening after a reboot, as I started booting new kernel. Reverting to 2.6.20 (in my case, the FC6 kernel) worked perfectly.

$ /sbin/lspci | grep Ethernet
04:00.0 Ethernet controller: Marvell Technology Group Ltd. 88E8056 PCI-E Gigabit Ethernet Controller (rev 14)